Brief Information on Patent Drawings

(See the Manual of Patent Examining Procedure (MPEP) 608.02 for the full requirements of patent drawings at http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/mpep/documents/0600_608_02.htm#sect608.02)


Note: Patent drawings must completely support the claims and the specification when the application is submitted to meet the enabling disclosure requirement. Later supplied drawings or changes cannot overcome deficiencies in the specification that were present at the time of application


35 U.S.C. 113. Drawings.

The applicant shall furnish a drawing where necessary for the understanding of the subject matter to be patented. When the nature of such subject matter admits of illustration by a drawing and the applicant has not furnished such a drawing, the Commissioner may require its submission within a time period of not less than two months from the sending of a notice thereof. Drawings submitted after the filing date of the application may not be used (i) to overcome any insufficiency of the specification due to lack of an enabling disclosure or otherwise inadequate disclosure therein, or (ii) to supplement the original disclosure thereof for the purpose of interpretation of the scope of any claim.


37 CFR 1.81. Drawings required in patent application.

(a)The applicant for a patent is required to furnish a drawing of his or her invention where necessary for the understanding of the subject matter sought to be patented; this drawing, or a high quality copy thereof, must be filed with the application. Since corrections are the responsibility of the applicant, the original drawing(s) should be retained by the applicant for any necessary future correction.

(b)Drawings may include illustrations which facilitate an understanding of the invention (for example, flow sheets in cases of processes, and diagrammatic views).

(c)Whenever the nature of the subject matter sought to be patented admits of illustration by a drawing without its being necessary for the understanding of the subject matter and the applicant has not furnished such a drawing, the examiner will require its submission within a time period of not less than two months from the date of the sending of a notice thereof.

(d)Drawings submitted after the filing date of the application may not be used to overcome any insufficiency of the specification due to lack of an enabling disclosure or otherwise inadequate disclosure therein, or to supplement the original disclosure thereof for the purpose of interpretation of the scope of any claim.


37 CFR 1.84. Standards for drawings.

[  ] (h)Views. The drawing must contain as many views as necessary to show the invention. The views may be plan, elevation, section, or perspective views. Detail views of portions of elements, on a larger scale if necessary, may also be used. All views of the drawing must be grouped together and arranged on the sheet(s) without wasting space, preferably in an upright position, clearly separated from one another, and must not be included in the sheets containing the specifications, claims, or abstract. Views must not be connected by projection lines and must not contain center lines.


What are plan, elevation, section, or perspective views? These terms are not defined in the Manual of Patent Examining Procedure (MPEP) but their potential uses are given. As example of plan, elevation, and perspective views are shown below. These are extracted from an issued design patent D570605.


Perspective views are the view of choice in A Guide to Filing a Design Patent Application at the USPTO web site: “[P]erspective views [can] be submitted to clearly show the appearance and shape of three-dimensional designs. If a perspective view is submitted, the surfaces shown would normally not be required to be illustrated in other views if these surfaces are clearly understood and fully disclosed in the perspective.” (See A Guide to Filing a Design Patent Application at http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/design/toc.html for more information.)


Some common definitions of the terms are: Plan view is defined as a vertical orthographic projection of an object on a horizontal plane, like a map. A plan is understood to be drawn at a particular vertical position with everything above that vertical position omitted as opposed to "elevation" which means how the object will look when seen from a side or a “section” where the object is shown cut along an axis to reveal the interior.


Special requirements for sectional views (from 37 CFR 1.84 Standards for drawings). The plane upon which a sectional view is taken should be indicated on the view from which the section is cut by a broken line. The ends of the broken line should be designated by Arabic or Roman numerals corresponding to the view number of the sectional view, and should have arrows to indicate the direction of sight. Hatching must be used to indicate section portions of an object, and must be made by regularly spaced oblique parallel lines spaced sufficiently apart to enable the lines to be distinguished without difficulty. Hatching should not impede the clear reading of the reference characters and lead lines. If it is not possible to place reference characters outside the hatched area, the hatching may be broken off wherever reference characters are inserted. Hatching must be at a substantial angle to the surrounding axes or principal lines, preferably 45°. A cross section must be set out and drawn to show all of the materials as they are shown in the view from which the cross section was taken. The parts in cross section must show proper material(s) by hatching with regularly spaced parallel oblique strokes, the space between strokes being chosen on the basis of the total area to be hatched. The various parts of a cross section of the same item should be hatched in the same manner and should accurately and graphically indicate the nature of the material(s) that is illustrated in cross section. The hatching of juxtaposed different elements must be angled in a different way. In the case of large areas, hatching may be confined to an edging drawn around the entire inside of the outline of the area to be hatched. Different types of hatching should have different conventional meanings as regards the nature of a material seen in cross section.


DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of our new design for a head for a cosmetic applicator;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the head for a cosmetic applicator shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation view of the head for a cosmetic applicator shown in FIG. 1, the opposite side view being a mirror image thereof;

FIG. 4 is a bottom plan view of the head for a cosmetic applicator shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is an end view of the head for a cosmetic applicator shown in FIG. 1; and,

FIG. 6 is an opposite and inverted end view of the head for a cosmetic applicator shown in FIG. 5.

The broken lines shown in the figures are for illustrative purposes only and form no part of the claimed design.


The issued design patent that this was extracted from can be viewed at Google patents at: http://www.google.com/patents/about?id=cnOqAAAAEBAJ&dq=D570605


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